All posts filed under: Visual Literacy

My Visual Literacy class at American University

The Title Sequence

Monsters Inc. (click above to see the video) The reason I chose this movie to show how much I love the art of the title sequence, is not only because it’s adorable, but also because I love the jazzy music and the fact that it’s animated. The two things that the Monsters Inc. title sequence does best thats also important when making the opening credits, is that it introduced the plot/ theme and it created an entrance for the first scenes of the movie. Lets Break it Down The first thing we see is a mixture of odd shapes in varying sizes, and then we see what seems to be a keyhole. After all of the other shapes rearrange themselves we see that they actually create a door. This is where the plot comes in, the door has a bit of a glow over it for a second and then it opens to show clothes and other thingamabobs. Now we know that it’s a closet. The door closes, and when it reopens there’s no longer …

YOLO: How to

In this music video by The Lonely Island, we get a new twist on the meaning yolo. Yolo stands for you only live once, in a way it’s the new generations way of saying carpe diem. Yolo is a term used when someone is about to, or already has done a stupid or regretable thing. But in this music video yolo is taken literally, and they sing about the precautions you should take because you only have one life and it would be better if you were alive for it (deep). Towards the end the lonely island sings “you oughta look out also stands for yolo” Featuring Adam Levine & Kendrick Lamar WIth this video I bestow upon you the staples of every good music video 1) Triangles Triangles Triangles & Threes Triangles triangulate of course. They help center and frame the singer. In this scene no one is singing but the lyrics are about the chastity belt and the women are pointing to the belt. Which makes this a triangle too. Here is an …

How to show perspective: with Pulp Fiction

Pulp fiction is one of the most iconic Quentin Tarantino films, and if you haven’t seen it, I suggest you watch it before you read this review. I’ll wait for you . . .   If there were ever a tutorial on how to shoot movie scenes to show a characters perspective, I would hope there would be a scene from Pulp Fiction. What better movie can portray so many point of views from so many various (awesome) characters? Right from the beginning we get a lovely shot of a couple in a diner. Wide Shot puts them both in the frame and you can easily see their interactions show that they might be a couple. Everything in the shot is trying to sell that they’re an ordinary couple on an ordinary day, from the simple lighting and the constant Wide Shot, and over the shoulder shot. Suddenly the conversation veers off into unordinary and then the couple decides to rob the diner. As soon as the couple stand up and show their true colors, …